Coagulation and Preparation of Soft Unripened Cheese from Camel Milk using Camel Chymosin

  • Tekuam Walle Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
  • Mohammed Yusuf Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
  • Richard Ipsen Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Denmark
  • Yonas Hailu Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
  • Mitiku Eshetu Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University

Abstract

Abstract: Camel milk is known for not being suitable for processing it into different dairy products.
Efforts have been made to make cheese from camel milk, but still there is no well accepted
manufacturing protocol to be adopted. Hence this experiment was initiated to investigate the effect of
different levels of camel chymosin concentrations on camel milk gelation properties and the influence
of cooking (at 55oC) on the characteristics of soft un-ripened cheese made from camel milk. Soft
unripened cheese was made with 3x2 factorial design with CRD arrangement in which three levels of
camel chymosin concentrations (40, 70, and 100 IMCU/L) and two levels of cooking (cooked and
uncooked curd) and then cheese quality, yield, texture profile analysis (TPA) hardness and sensory
attributes were analyzed. The shortest gelation time was observed for camel chymosin concentration of
100 IMCU/L and 70 IMCU/L whereas the highest maximum gel firmness was observed for camel
chymosin level of 40 IMCU/L. Significantly highest (P<0.001) cheese yield was observed for uncooked
cheese at 100 IMCU/ L coagulant level. Cooked cheese made using 100 IMCU/L had significantly
highest values for protein, total solid, ash and hardness. Whereas, the color, texture and appearance
scores were significantly higher for 40 IMCU/L cooked cheese. However, the taste, aroma and overall
acceptance of cooked cheese made using 70 IMCU/L gave the highest score. It could be concluded
that, using medium level chymosin concentration (70 IMCU/L) as well as cooking of camel milk curd
could be suitable approaches for making of soft unripened cheese from camel milk.
Keywords: Camel chymosin; Camel milk; Coagulation; Cooking

Author Biographies

Tekuam Walle, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University

School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Ethiopia

Mohammed Yusuf, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
Richard Ipsen, Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Denmark
University of Copenhagen, Department of Food Science, Denmark
Yonas Hailu, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
Mitiku Eshetu, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University
School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Haramaya University, Ethiopia

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Published
2017-06-01