Traditional Fermented Dairy Products of Ethiopia: A Review

  • Tesfemariam Berhe Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia 2Department of
  • Finn Kvist Vogensen Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Richard Ipsen Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
  • Eyassu Seifu Food Science and Technology, Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Gaborone, Botswana
  • Mohammed Y. Kurtu Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
  • Egon Bech Hansen Food Microbiology, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark,

Abstract

Abstract: Fermented foods play an important role in human nutrition and protecting against infectious
diseases. Understanding the properties of traditionally fermented dairy products as well as a proper
analysis of the indigenous processing steps are important in order to recommend appropriate
manufacturing protocol and procedures for commercialization. Little information is available on the
general characteristics and processing practices of traditional dairy products of Ethiopia. Therefore, the
objective of this review was to critically assess and summarize information on indigenous fermented dairy
products of the country. The traditional dairy products included in this review are ergo (spontaneously
fermented milk), ititu (spontaneously fermented milk curd), kibe (traditional butter), neter kibe (ghee),
dhanaan (Ethiopian fermented camel milk), ayib (Ethiopian cottage cheese), hazo (spiced fermented
buttermilk), arera (defatted sour milk) and aguat (acid whey). The indigenous dairy products have good
nutritional and functional potential to scale up to commercial production. However, detailed investigation
on the characterization of the products and standardization of the manufacturing steps should be
undertaken. The huge potential of microbial biodiversity related with the long storage stability of the
traditional dairy products especially dhanaan and ititu shows promising potential for development of
technologically important indigenous starter cultures.

Keywords: Ayib; Dhanaan; Ergo; Ethiopian dairy products; Ititu.

Author Biographies

Tesfemariam Berhe, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia 2Department of

School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
2Department of

Finn Kvist Vogensen, Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark
Richard Ipsen, Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
Department of Food Science, University of Copenhagen, Denmark,
Eyassu Seifu, Food Science and Technology, Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Gaborone, Botswana

Department of Food Science and Technology, Botswana University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Gaborone, Botswana

Mohammed Y. Kurtu, Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
School of Animal and Range Sciences, College of Agriculture, Haramaya University, Ethiopia
Egon Bech Hansen, Food Microbiology, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark,
Division of Food Microbiology, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark,

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